Littlehampton couple’s shock after finding fox cub with head stuck in concrete mosquito trap

A Littlehampton couple had quite the shock when they woke up one morning to find a fox cub stuck in a concrete mosquito trap in their garden.

Wednesday, 16th June 2021, 1:42 pm

Wendy Bradmore and Keith Collins found the stricken cub stuck in what appeared to be a large concrete base in their garden on Tuesday morning (June 15).

Wendy said: “We came downstairs at around 7am and spotted the silly little fox with her head well and truly stuck. She appeared to be wedged in a big chunk of concrete but my Keith explained that it was an old mosquito trap made out of concrete with a hole in the middle which was used to attract the bugs and trap them inside.

“It seems she’d dislodged the metal part that sat inside and pushed her head inside but got stuck. I didn’t even know this thing was in the garden and it was really upsetting to see her stuck there, distressed and struggling to breathe.

Wendy Bradmore and Keith Collins, of Littlehampton, found the stricken cub stuck in what appeared to be a large concrete base in their garden. Picture: RSPCA

“We tried to give her some water but she was incredibly frightened so we called the experts for help.”

The couple contacted the RSPCA’s emergency line and inspector Kate Barnes came out to help.

She said: “We found a small piece of cake at the bottom of the gap so we think she followed her nose in there for a snack and bit off more than she could chew!

“The concrete was very thick and strong so I called for assistance from West Sussex Fire & Rescue Service’s technical rescue team.”

Wendy Bradmore and Keith Collins, of Littlehampton, found the stricken cub stuck in what appeared to be a large concrete base in their garden. Picture: RSPCA

Kate said firefighters managed to break the concrete using spreaders but had to be incredibly careful not to injure the fox in the process.

“We popped her in a cage and checked her over but, thankfully, she didn’t appear to have any injuries from her ordeal,” she added.

“It’s always a last resort taking a fox – especially a youngster – away from their home and family so I decided she was well enough to release in the garden so she could find her way back to her den and recover in the comfort of her own home!

“Hopefully next time she’ll think before she follows her nose – or her stomach!”