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A glimpse into history at Arundel Museum’s exhibit

The Duchess of Norfork opens a photography exhibion by local photographer, Marilyn Stafford. Pictured is Marilyn at the exhibition.

The Duchess of Norfork opens a photography exhibion by local photographer, Marilyn Stafford. Pictured is Marilyn at the exhibition.

AN EXHIBITION of work by an internationally-acclaimed photo-journalist was opened by the Duchess of Norfolk in Arundel, on Saturday.

Dozens of people watched as the duchess officially opened the first exhibition of Marilyn Stafford at the Arundel Museum, in Mill Road.

The work is a collection of Marilyn’s photos spanning her impressive career, which has seen her images published in the likes of Vogue, The Observer and the International Herald Tribune, among others.

Many of the pictures are portraits of celebrities and historical figures, from journalist David Frost and scientist Albert Einstein to celebrities Joanna Lumley and Twiggy. Others depict her various trips abroad.

Museum manager James Brigden described the collection as ‘exciting’ and said this was the most prestigious and ‘highbrow’ art display that has been displayed at the museum, since its new building was opened earlier this year.

“This is a fantastic exhibition,” he said. “It’s a retrospective look back at Marilyn Stafford’s impressive photographic career.

“It’s a collection of images taken during the 1940s, 50s and 60s. There are a lot of great pictures of famous celebrities and well-known figures. It’s a unique insight into her work.”

James added the exhibition had been the idea of one of the members at the museum, who put the Marilyn in contact with the site.

“It’s an honour to have Marilyn exhibiting with us,” James added. “We have already had many positive reviews from visitors.

“This is our most highbrow display since opening in June.”

Marilyn Stafford lived in Paris for many years and her photographic career developed there through the encouragement of her friends, photographers Robert Capa and Henri Cartier-Bresson.

The exhibition includes a selection of unpublished personal photographs of “A day in the Life of Indira Gandhi” following the outbreak of war in Pakistan in 1971.

The display was due to finish tomorrow. However, museum staff are now keeping it open until December 20.

For details, call 01903 885866.

 

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